Top > African Study Monographs > ASM Supplementary Issue Back Number > No.20 (1994)
Study of the Tertiary Hominoids and Their Palaeoenvironments in East Africa: 5
Faunal Change of Late Miocene Africa and Eurasia: Mammalian Fauna from the Namurungule Formation, Samburu Hills, Northern Kenya

Edited by Hidemi ISHIDAand Hideo NAKAYA


pp. 1-112

Faunal Change of Late Miocene Africa and Eurasia: Mammalian Fauna from the Namurungule Formation, Samburu Hills, Northern Kenya

Hideo NAKAYA
Department of Earth Sciences, Kagawa University

ABSTRACT
   The Namurungule Formation yields a large amount of mammals of a formerly unknown and diversified vertebrate assemblage of the late Miocene. The Namurungule Formation has been dated as approximately 7 to 10 Ma. This age agrees with the mammalian assemblage of the Namurungule Formation. Sedimentological evidence of this formation supports that the Namurungule Formation was deposited in lacustrine and/or fluvial environments. Numerous equid and bovid remains were found form the Namurungule Formation. These taxa indicate the open woodland to savanna environments. Assemblage of the Namurungule Fauna indicates a close similarity to those of North Africa, Southwest and Central Europe, and some similarity to Sub-Paratethys, Siwaliks and East Asia faunas. The Namurungule Fauna was the richest among late Miocene (Turolian) Sub-Saharan faunas. From an analysis of Neogene East Africa faunas, it became clear that mammalian faunal assemblage drastically has changed from woodland fauna to openland fauna during Astaracian to Turolian. The Namurungule Fauna is the forerunner of the modern Sub-Saharan (Ethiopian) faunas in savanna and woodland environments.

Key Words: Mammal; Neogene; Miocene; Sub-Saharan Africa; Kenya; Paleobiogeography; Paleoecology; Faunal turnover.

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