Top > African Study Monographs > ASM Back Number > Vol. 36 (2015) No. 3
Vol. 36 (2015) No. 3
pp. 139–154

THE INTERCULTURAL DIMENSION OF AFRICAN PHILOSOPHY

Bekele Gutema
Department of philosophy, Addis Ababa University

ABSTRACT

African philosophy assumes that philosophy is a field of knowledge in which humans think about their very being and their place in nature, and that it is the province of
humanity at large rather than of some segment thereof. Questions such as “Does African
philosophy exist?” and “What is African philosophy?” have elicited protracted debates on the
nature of philosophy and of rationality in general. This debate has yielded important texts in the
field of African philosophy. Intercultural philosophy is a new orientation that assumes that
philosophy originated in different cultures and at different times. It claims that Eurocentric
assumptions about the origin and nature of philosophy are incorrect. Instead, it argues that there
are different philosophies and that it is important for proponents of these philosophies to engage
in dialogues or, ideally, polylogues. The ability to comprehend humanity’s problems in a global
age requires that representatives of different cultures and philosophies understand one another.
This can be productive if it is approached from hermeneutic and intercultural perspectives. This
article highlights intercultural elements in African philosophy that exemplify and derive from
the indispensability of an intercultural perspective and recommends that a genuine philosophy
that is able to serve humanity in a global age must be able to function interculturally.


Key Words: African philosophy; Intercultural philosophy; Dialogue/Polylogue; Deconstruction;
Reconstruction.

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pp. 155–187

NEWS FRAMING OF THE 2003 IRAQ WAR: A STUDY OF THE SUB-SAHARAN AFRICAN PRESS

Mohamed El-Bendary
former journalism lecturer, Massey University in New Zealand

ABSTRACT

After a two-day ultimatum demanding that Saddam Hussein step down, the
United States attacked Iraq on March 19, 2003. The Iraq War generated a variety of emotions
around the globe, particularly in the developing world. The sub-Saharan African press viewed
it as a war without convincing legal or moral justification, perceiving it to be a tool used by the
US to gain global economic, military, and strategic influence. Employing framing analysis, this
study investigates how the sub-Saharan African press constructed a number of different social
realities of the same war.

Key Words: Iraq war; Sub-Saharan African press; News framing; Discourse analysis.

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pp. 189–209

DIET OF SAVANNA CHIMPANZEES IN THE UGALLA AREA, TANZANIA

Midori YOSHIKAWA
United Graduate School of Agricultural Science,
Tokyo University of Agriculture and Technology

Hideshi OGAWA
School of International Liberal Studies, Chukyo University

ABSTRACT

We studied the diet of chimpanzees (Pan troglodytes) in the Ugalla savanna
woodland area of western Tanzania. This area is the most eastern habitat and one of the driest
and most open habitats of chimpanzees. Field surveys were conducted mainly at the Nguye and
Bhukalai sites in Ugalla from 1995 to 2011, during which we collected 465 feces of chimpanzees.
From the discernable components of the Ugalla chimpanzees’ diet in the fecal samples we
collected and recorded, we compared the diet of these chimpanzees with that of chimpanzees in
wet habitats, especially Mahale and Gombe in Tanzania, in the literature. Chimpanzees in
Ugalla had eaten 117 plant parts of 100 plant species, 1 bird species, at least 1 small mammal
species, and at least 3 insect species, including termites and ants. These chimpanzees in Ugalla
ate fewer plant species and plant parts, more underground storage organs of plants, and fewer
vertebrates and invertebrates than did the chimpanzees in Mahale and Gombe.


Key Words: Chimpanzee; Diet; Savanna woodland; Dry habitat.

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